Solving Buffer Problems

Solving Buffer Problems-68
A more useful relationship relates a buffer’s p H to the initial concentrations of the weak acid and the weak base.We can derive a general buffer equation by considering the following reactions for a weak acid, HA, and the salt of its conjugate weak base, Na A.Example: Calculate the p H of a buffer solution that initially consists of 0.0400 moles of ammonia and 0.0250 moles of ammonium ion, after 20.0 m L of 0.75 M Na OH has been added to the buffer.

A more useful relationship relates a buffer’s p H to the initial concentrations of the weak acid and the weak base.We can derive a general buffer equation by considering the following reactions for a weak acid, HA, and the salt of its conjugate weak base, Na A.Example: Calculate the p H of a buffer solution that initially consists of 0.0400 moles of ammonia and 0.0250 moles of ammonium ion, after 20.0 m L of 0.75 M Na OH has been added to the buffer.

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The maximum amount of base that can be added is equal to the amount of weak acid present in the buffer.

Example: What is the maximum amount of acid that can be added to a buffer made by the mixing of 0.35 moles of sodium hydrogen carbonate with 0.50 moles of sodium carbonate?

Example: 50.0 m L of 0.100 M HCl was added to a buffer consisting of 0.025 moles of sodium acetate and 0.030 moles of acetic acid.

What is the p H of the buffer after the addition of the acid?

The p H of the buffer solution decreases by a very small amount because of this ( a lot less than if the buffer system was not present).

An "ICE" chart is useful in determining the p H of the system after a strong acid has been added.= 1.82 [A⁻] = 1.82[HA] Also, [A⁻] [HA] = 0.100 mol/L 1.82[HA] [HA] = 0.100 mol/L 2.82[HA] = 0.100 mol/L [HA] = 0.0355 mol/L [A⁻] = (0.100 – 0.0355) mol/L = 0.0645 mol/L You need 0.0355 mol of acetic acid and 0.0645 mol of sodium acetate to prepare 1 L of the buffer.More than one problem with solutions with additional info here.A buffer solution is one in which the p H of the solution is "resistant" to small additions of either a strong acid or strong base.Buffers usually consist of a weak acid and its conjugate base, in relatively equal and "large" quantities.How much base can be added before the p H will begin to show a significant change?Adding as little as 0.1 m L of concentrated \(HCl\) to a liter of \(H_2O\) shifts the p H from 7.0 to 3.0.Assuming the change in volume when the sodium acetate is not significant, estimate the p H of the acetic acid/sodium acetate buffer solution.The K This results in a decrease in the amount of conjugate base present and an increase in the amount of the weak acid.should be quite close to the desired p H so that the ratio of base to acid in the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation will be close to 1.As the ratio of base to acid deviates from 1, the addition of acids and bases to the buffer will have a more profound effect on the p H.

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