Parsons T. Essays In Sociological Theory

Parsons T. Essays In Sociological Theory-12
We use cookies to make interactions with our website easy and meaningful, to better understand the use of our services, and to tailor advertising.For further information, including about cookie settings, please read our Cookie Policy .Even American citizenship, aiming for maximum inclusion of all persons irrespective of ascriptive features, appeared meaningfully linked to Protestantism's eminently democratic "priesthood of all believers."For Weber, the modern world increasingly became disenchanted; for Parsons, a liberalized version of Christian culture continued to shape American society in the mid-twentieth century.

We use cookies to make interactions with our website easy and meaningful, to better understand the use of our services, and to tailor advertising.For further information, including about cookie settings, please read our Cookie Policy .Even American citizenship, aiming for maximum inclusion of all persons irrespective of ascriptive features, appeared meaningfully linked to Protestantism's eminently democratic "priesthood of all believers."For Weber, the modern world increasingly became disenchanted; for Parsons, a liberalized version of Christian culture continued to shape American society in the mid-twentieth century.

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He also continued to question Durkheim's equation of church and society, because it denied the possibility of differentiating a religious and a distinctly social sphere.

Still, Parsons's view of action and order owed much to Durkheim.

Parsons's first and last publications (1928-1929, 1979)—on Weber's and Sombart's view of capitalism and on economic and religious symbolism in the West, respectively—display the strong Weberian thrust in all his work.

Like Weber, Parsons was interested in the religious roots of modern culture, which he sought in the implications of the Protestant Reformation.

Parsons developed a general, voluntaristic theory of action, based on influential, imaginative readings of the sociological classics, which he applied to a wide variety of sociological problems.

He played an important role as an early translator of major European studies, most notably Max Weber's Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism (Scribner 1930).

In the West, Parsons argued, religion maintained a crucial cultural role precisely in counteracting the potential dominance of economic thought and action.

Were such tension to disappear, one may infer, Western history would come to an end.

The tension between religious culture and economic action could not be eliminated.

In this respect, he actually extended a Weberian idea.

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