Essays Over The Woman'S Suffrage Movement

Essays Over The Woman'S Suffrage Movement-87
Though these movements differed in their reasons and tactics, the fight for female suffrage, along with other women’s rights concerns, cut across many national boundaries.By exploring the following topics, this essay attempts to help rectify the narrow and unexamined view of female suffrage.

Though these movements differed in their reasons and tactics, the fight for female suffrage, along with other women’s rights concerns, cut across many national boundaries.By exploring the following topics, this essay attempts to help rectify the narrow and unexamined view of female suffrage.Musical substance ranges from Dame Ethel Smyth's famous anthem of the movement, "The March of the Women" to amateur songs likely never performed in large public forums. Often, songs were dedicated to women prominent in the movement, on both the national and local level.

And, the reasons for the depth of its opposition ignored.

Why, for example, did it take until May, 2005, for women in Kuwait to finally achieve their full voting rights in their national elections?

published a story about suffragists in Los Angeles who were holding a public rally.

Police informed the women that "votes for women" speeches were prohibited at the rally; to circumvent the ordinance, the suffragists set those suffrage speeches to music and sang their message instead.

A few were even inscribed by suffragists or previously belonged to a suffragist's personal library.

Two pieces in this collection bear the name of Sophonisba P.

Breckinridge (1866-1948) as previous owner (although no conclusive proof of ownership could be found).

Breckinridge was the first woman graduate of the University of Chicago law school and a social worker, educator, and associate of Hull House from 1907 to 1920.

Abolitionists and reformers Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia Mott organized the now-famous 1848 convention in Seneca Falls, New York (July 19-20) that many historians regard as the official start of the movement.

The convention was followed in quick succession by two significant organized meetings: first, a celebration of Emancipation Day on August 1, 1848 in Rochester, New York to honor the abolition of slavery in British and French West Indies, and, second, the Rochester Women's Rights Convention on August 2, 1848.

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