Art History Formal Analysis Thesis

Art History Formal Analysis Thesis-76
These ideas and, even more, these words, gained additional fame in the English-speaking world when the painter and art critic Jonathan Richardson (1665-1745) included a version of de Piles’s system in a popular guide to Italy.Intended for travelers, Richardson’s book was read by everyone who was interested in art.

These ideas and, even more, these words, gained additional fame in the English-speaking world when the painter and art critic Jonathan Richardson (1665-1745) included a version of de Piles’s system in a popular guide to Italy.Intended for travelers, Richardson’s book was read by everyone who was interested in art.

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This approach reflected Fry’s study of the natural sciences as an undergraduate.

Even more important were his studies as a painter, which made him especially aware of the importance of how things had been made.

From these three sentences, the reader gathers enough information to visualize the surface of the work.

The size of the strokes, their shape, the direction they take on the canvas, and how they relate to the forms they create are all explained. On the other hand, the reader has not been given the most basic facts about what the picture represents.

Fry made his argument through careful study of individual paintings, many in private collections and almost all of them unfamiliar to his readers.

Although the book included reproductions of the works, they were small black-and-white illustrations, murky in tone and detail, which conveyed only the most approximate idea of the pictures.

Each form seems to have a surprising amplitude, to permit of our apprehending it with an ease which surprises us, and yet they admit a free circulation in the surrounding space.

It is above all the main directions given by the rectilinear lines of the napkin and the knife that make us feel so vividly this horizontal extension [of space].

Furthermore, Fry warned his readers, “it must always be kept in mind that such [written] analysis halts before the ultimate concrete reality of the work of art, and perhaps in proportion to the greatness of the work it must leave untouched a greater part of the objective.” (Private collection, Paris), painted about 1880.

The lengthy analysis of the picture begins with a description of the application of paint.

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