Addison'S Essays From The Spectator

Addison'S Essays From The Spectator-33
There runs² a Story in the Family, that when my Mother was gone with Child of me about three Months, she dreamt that she was brought to Bed of a Judge.Whether this might proceed from a Law-suit which was then depending in the Family, or my Father’s being a Justice of the Peace, I cannot determine; for I am not so vain as to think it presaged any Dignity that I should arrive at in my future Life, though that was the Interpretation which the Neighbourhood put upon it.The College of Physicians had been first established in Linacre’s House, No.

There runs² a Story in the Family, that when my Mother was gone with Child of me about three Months, she dreamt that she was brought to Bed of a Judge.Whether this might proceed from a Law-suit which was then depending in the Family, or my Father’s being a Justice of the Peace, I cannot determine; for I am not so vain as to think it presaged any Dignity that I should arrive at in my future Life, though that was the Interpretation which the Neighbourhood put upon it.

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It is for this Reason likewise, that I keep my Complexion and Dress, as very great Secrets; tho’ it is not impossible, but I may make Discoveries of both in the Progress of the Work I have undertaken.

After having been thus particular upon my self, I shall in to-Morrow’s Paper give an Account of those Gentlemen who are concerned with me in this Work.

I must confess I would gratify my Reader in any thing that is reasonable; but as for these three Particulars, though I am sensible they might tend very much to the Embellishment of my Paper, I cannot yet come to a Resolution of communicating them to the Publick.

They would indeed draw me out of that Obscurity which I have enjoyed for many Years, and expose me in Publick Places to several Salutes and Civilities, which have been always very disagreeable to me; for the greatest pain I can suffer, is the being talked to, and being stared at.

Thus I live in the World, rather as a Spectator of Mankind, than as one of the Species; by which means I have made my self a Speculative Statesman, Soldier, Merchant, and Artizan, without ever medling with any Practical Part in Life.

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I am very well versed in the Theory of an Husband, or a Father, and can discern the Errors in the Œconomy, Business, and Diversion of others, better than those who are engaged in them; as Standers-by discover Blots, which are apt to escape those who are in the Game.Fonvive, a learned and grave French Protestant, who was said to make £600 a year by it, was a penny paper in the highest repute, Fonvive having secured for his weekly chronicle of foreign news a good correspondence in Italy, Spain, Portugal, Germany, Flanders, Holland.John Dunton, the bookseller, in his Coffee House was the last house but one on the south-west corner of St. On its site is now a pile of buildings looking down Pall Mall. James’s Palace, it was a place of resort for Whig officers of the Guards and men of fashion.For this Reason therefore, I shall publish a Sheet full of Thoughts every Morning, for the Benefit of my Contemporaries; and if I can any way contribute to the Diversion or Improvement of the Country in which I live, I shall leave it, when I am summoned out of it, with the secret Satisfaction of thinking that I have not Lived in vain.There are three very material Points which I have not spoken to in this Paper, and which, for several important Reasons, I must keep to my self, at least for some Time: I mean, an Account of my Name, my Age, and my Lodgings.As the chief trouble of Compiling, Digesting, and Correcting will fall to my Share, I must do myself the Justice to open the Work with my own History.I was born to a small Hereditary Estate, which according to the tradition of the village where it lies,¹ was bounded by the same Hedges and Ditches in William the Conqueror’s Time that it is at present, and has been delivered down from Father to Son whole and entire, without the Loss or Acquisition of a single Field or Meadow, during the Space of six hundred Years.The Royal Society, until its removal in 1711 to Crane Court, Fleet Street, had its rooms further east, at Gresham College.Physicians, therefore, and philosophers, as well as the clergy, used , established and edited by M.Whilst I was in this Learned Body, I applied myself with so much Diligence to my Studies, that there are very few celebrated Books, either in the Learned or the Modern Tongues, which I am not acquainted with.Upon the Death of my Father I was resolved to travel into Foreign Countries, and therefore left the University, with the Character of an odd unaccountable Fellow, that had a great deal of Learning, if I would but show it.

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  • Full text of "The Spectator; essays I.-L. by Joseph Addison and.
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    Full text of "The Spectator; essays I.-L. by Joseph Addison and Richard Steele With an introd. and notes by John Morrison" See other formats…

  • Joseph Addison Critical Essays -
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    Joseph Addison wrote an article, "Party Patches," in the satirical newspaper he and Sir Richard Steele published called The Spectator meant to "delight and instruct". It is important to note.…

  • Critical Essays from the Spectator by Joseph Addison - OUP
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    Critical Essays from the Spectator by Joseph Addison With Four Essays by Richard Steele. First Edition. Donald F Bond. Authoritative text, together with an introduction, commentary notes, and scholarly apparatus.…

  • The Spectator British periodical 1711–1712
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    The Spectator, a periodical published in London by the essayists Sir Richard Steele and Joseph Addison from March 1, 1711, to Dec. 6, 1712 appearing daily, and subsequently revived by Addison in 1714 for 80 numbers.…

  • The Spectator – The Open Anthology of Literature in English
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    The Spectator. On his own, Addison revived The Spectator briefly for a few months in 1714, but these essays were generally not as popular. Of these, about 250 issues each were written by Addison and Steele; Addison’s cousin Eustace Budgell contributed as small number, as did the poet John Hughes.…

  • Joseph Addison 1672-1719 The Aims of the Spectator
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    Addison and Steele had clear moral intentions behind the writing of the essays for the spectator series. They aimed at social reformation, an important in the manners and morals of the people of that age and the remover of existing removal of existing ignorance.…

  • Addison Party Patches - Home W. W. Norton & Company
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    JOSEPH ADDISON and SIR RICHARD STEELE 1672–1719 1672–1729 addison Party Patches The Spectator, No. 81, Saturday, June 2, 1711. Qualis ubi audio venaium murmure tigris Horruit in maculas 1—— —statius, Thebaid II.128.…

  • Sir Roger de Coverley essays from the Spectator Addison, Joseph.
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    Sir Roger de Coverley essays from the Spectator by Addison, Joseph, 1672-1719;. From title page "Essays from the Spectator by Addison and Steele". Cover and.…

  • Joseph Addison – Essays from “The Spectator” – Reading The Norton.
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    Joseph Addison – Essays from “The Spectator”. The essay is a hymn of praise for capitalism and trade. In this essay the author says he loves to visit the Royal Exchange, because he revels in the atmosphere of business, where people from so many nations mix freely. He admits it makes him proud to be English.…

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